Many of these issues did not surface during standard investigations for security clearances, but surfaced during polygraph examinations required as part of the processing for access eligibility for Sensitive Compartment Information (SCI).

Guideline D: Sexual Behavior of the December 2009 Sexual behavior that involves a criminal offense, indicates a personality or emotional disorder, reflects lack of judgment or discretion, or which may subject the individual to undue influence or coercion, exploitation, or duress can raise questions about an individual’s reliability, trustworthiness and ability to protect classified information.

Ts cam no cc porn-8

This included sodomy, heterosexual promiscuity, wife-swapping, transvestism, transsexualism, and aberrant, deviant, or bizarre sexual conduct. When assessing sexual behavior, adjudicators must first consider whether the behavior is relevant to a security clearance determination before they consider whether it is true.

Today sexual behavior is relevant when it is compulsive, self-destructive, high-risk, or criminal; creates susceptibility to coercion; occurs in public; or shows poor judgment.

If at least one of these factors is not present, sodomy, promiscuity, adultery, group sex, cyber-sex, swinging, pornography, sadism, masochism, fetishism, bondage and degradation, homosexuality, bisexuality, transsexualism, and transvestism are not disqualifying conditions for a security clearance.

Only 2 cases cited extramarital affairs, and both of these cases involved current sexual relationships about which their spouses were unaware.

Involvement with prostitutes was cited in 4 cases, 5 cases cited possession of child pornography, and 15 cases cited sexual acts with children.

The remaining cases involved voyeurism, exhibitionism, and compulsive, self-destructive viewing of pornography.

Eight-nine percent of the cases citing sexual behavior resulted in clearance denials.

Many people have concerns about how their past sexual indiscretions may negatively affect their security clearance eligibility.

Most sexual misconduct is either not a potentially disqualifying condition for a security clearance or can be fully mitigated by “passage of time without recurrence” and the absence of any susceptibility to blackmail or coercion.

Of the approximately 1160 cases decided by administrative judges at Defense Office of Hearings and Appeals (DOHA) in 2009 only 36 cited “Sexual Behavior” as a security/suitability issue.

Almost all of these 36 cases involved criminal conduct, and about half involved criminal convictions for sexual offenses.